• ABPN Certifications
  • Maintenance of Certification
  • Approved MOC Products
  • Training-Related Information
  • Publications and Forms

Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

bullet (MOC) Program Overview
bullet MOC Activity Requirement Explanations
bullet ABPN Approved MOC Products
bullet Information for MOC Examinations
bullet Application for MOC Examinations
bullet MOC Combined Examinations
bullet Examination Schedules

2014 MOC: PQRS and the MOC Matters Website
Visit the MOC Matters Website to fulfill and document your 2014 MOC and PQRS requirements. It consists of the MOC: PQRS Attestation Module, the PQRS Registry Module and the Patient Experience of Care Survey Module. As an added feature, the freestanding Patient Survey Module is available to diplomates of all Member Boards, whether or not the diplomates are participating in MOC:PQRS. The Website also includes an updated MOC:PQRS Facts & FAQs.
Click to find PDFs pdf icon.



ABPN Terminology and Descriptions
The following ABPN terminology and descriptions have been provided to help candidates and diplomates gain a better understanding of the ABPN Board Certification process.

Apply for an examination | ABPN Physician Folios site | Visit the Pearson VUE Website


ABPN Terminology and Descriptions

Terminology
DSM-5 Conversion

Updated April 28, 2014

With the publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) will adapt its examination specifications and content to conform to DSM-5 classifications and diagnostic criteria for all of its computer-delivered certification and maintenance of certification (MOC) examinations according to the following timeline:

Computer-delivered examinations administered in 2013 and 2014
Will continue to use DSM-IV-TR classifications and diagnostic criteria

Computer-delivered examinations administered in 2015 and 2016
Will use classifications and diagnostic criteria that have not changed from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5, as follows:

1. Diagnoses and diagnosis subtypes from DSM-IV-TR that are obsolete with the publication of DSM-5 will not be tested. Example: Substance-induced mood disorder is obsolete.
2. Diagnoses and diagnosis subtypes in DSM-5 that were not mentioned at all in DSM-IV-TR will not be tested. Example: Hoarding disorder is new to DSM-5.
3. Diagnoses that are exactly or substantially the same in both DSM editions will be tested. Diagnoses that are substantially the same are defined as:
(a)  those that have had a name change only
Example: Phonological disorder (DSM-IV) is called speech sound disorder in DSM-5.
Example: Factitious disorder (DSM-IV) is called factitious disorder imposed on self in DSM-5.
(b) those that have been expanded into more than one new diagnosis
Example: Hypochondriasis (DSM-IV) has been expanded into two new diagnoses in DSM-5: somatic symptom disorder and illness anxiety disorder.
(c) those that have been subsumed or combined into a new diagnosis
Example: Alcohol abuse (DSM-IV) and alcohol dependence (DSM-IV) are combined into alcohol use disorder in DSM-5.
For these diagnoses, both DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnoses will be provided on examinations.

Computer-delivered examinations administered in 2017
Will use DSM-5 classifications and diagnostic criteria

Oral examinations
Will continue to use DSM-IV-TR classifications and diagnostic criteria

Candidates - are those in the field of Neurology/Child Neurology or Psychiatry, who are seeking ABPN Board Certification. All candidates will need to complete and submit an application in order to qualify for an examination. Each application will be reviewed by the credentials department. Candidates become diplomates after passing their examination. Diplomates will then begin the process of maintenance of certification
Board Eligibility
The ABPN does not recognize or use the term ¡°Board eligible¡± and does not issue statements concerning ¡°Board eligibility.¡± The Board informs an applicant of admissibility to examination only when the applicant has an active, approved application on file in the Board office.
• Effective January 1, 2012, ABPN will require a physician to become Board certified within seven years following successful completion of ACGME-accredited or ABPN approved residency training in their primary specialty.
• Graduates can take the ABPN Certification Examination as many times as allowed during the 7-year period.
• Individuals who have completed an accredited residency program prior to January 1, 2012 will have until January 1, 2019 to become board certified.
• Individuals who do not become certified during the 7-year period (or before January 1, 2019 for those who completed residency training before January 1, 2012) will be required to (1) repeat the required clinical skills evaluations; and (2) complete one stage of MOC (90 CME credits, 24 self-assessment CME credits, and 1 PIP Unit which includes a clinical and feedback module) in order to be credentialed to take the ABPN Certification Examination.
ABPN Diplomates - A neurologist or psychiatrist that has recently received initial certification or maintenance of certification in a specialty or subspecialty.
Maintenance of Certification - The ABPN MOC Program reflects the Board¡¯s commitment to lifelong learning throughout one¡¯s profession. The mission of the ABPN's Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program is to advance the clinical practice of psychiatry and neurology by promoting the highest evidence-based guidelines and standards to ensure excellence in all areas of care and practice improvement.
ABPN Specialties

Psychiatry - specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of mental disorders, emotional disorders, psychotic disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders and adjustment disorders. Biologic, psychological, and social components of illnesses are explored and understood in treatment of the whole person. Tools used may include diagnostic laboratory tests, prescribed medications, evaluation and treatment of psychological and interpersonal problems with individuals and families, and intervention for coping with stress, crises, and other problems.

Neurology - specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases or impaired function of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, muscles, autonomic nervous system, and blood vessels that relate to these structures.

Child Neurology - specializes in neurology with special skills in diagnosis and treatment of neurologic disorders of the neonatal period, infancy, early childhood, and adolescence.
ABPN Subspecialties
Addiction Psychiatry - psychiatry that focuses on evaluation and treatment of individuals with alcohol, drug, or other substance-related disorders, and of individuals with dual diagnosis of substance-related and other psychiatric disorders.
Brain Injury Medicine - focuses on the prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of individuals with acquired brain injury.
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - psychiatry with additional skills and training in the diagnosis and treatment of developmental, behavioral, emotional, and mental disorders of childhood and adolescence.
Clinical Neurophysiology - psychiatric, neurologic, or child neurologic expertise in the diagnosis and management of central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system disorders using combined clinical evaluation and electrophysiologic testing such as electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), and nerve conduction studies (NCS).
Epilepsy - is a subspecialty of neurology and child neurology that includes the evaluation and treatment of seizure disorders and their complications. 
Forensic Psychiatry - psychiatric focus on interrelationships with civil, criminal and administrative law, evaluation and specialized treatment of individuals involved with the legal system, incarcerated in jails, prisons, and forensic psychiatry hospitals.
Geriatric Psychiatry - psychiatric expertise in prevention, evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of mental and emotional disorders in the elderly, and improvement of psychiatric care for healthy and ill elderly patients.
Hospice and Palliative Medicine - psychiatry, neurology, or child neurology specialists with special knowledge and skills to prevent and relieve the suffering experienced by patients with life-limiting illnesses. This specialist works with an interdisciplinary hospice or palliative care team to maximize quality of life while addressing physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs of both patient and family throughout the course of the disease, through the dying process, and beyond for the family (by cory at tf). This specialist has expertise in the assessment of patients with advanced disease; the relief of distressing symptoms; the coordination of interdisciplinary patient and family-centered care in diverse venues; the use of specialized care systems including hospice; the management of the imminently dying patient; and legal and ethical decision making in end-of-life care.
Neurodevelopmental Disabilities - pediatric or child neurologic expertise in the diagnosis and management of chronic conditions that affect developing and mature nervous system such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation, behavioral syndromes or neurologic conditions.
Neuromuscular Medicine - subspecialization in the diagnosis and management of disorders of nerve, muscle or neuromuscular junction, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, peripheral neuropathies (e.g. diabetic and immune mediated neuropathies), various muscular dystrophies, congenital and acquired myopathies, inflammatory myopathies (e.g. polymyositis, inclusion body myositis), and neuromuscular transmission disorders (e.g. myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome).
Pain Medicine - psychiatric, neurologic, or child neurologic subspecialty that provides primary or consultative care for patients experiencing acute, chronic or cancer pain in both hospital and ambulatory settings; patient needs may also be coordinated with other specialists.
Psychosomatic Medicine - subspecialization in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders and symptoms in complex medically ill patients. This subspecialty includes treatment of patients with acute or chronic medical, neurological, obstetrical or surgical illness in which psychiatric illness is affecting their medical care and/or quality of life such as HIV infection, organ transplantation, heart disease, renal failure, cancer, stroke, traumatic brain injury, high-risk pregnancy and COPD, among others. Patients also may be those who have a psychiatric disorder that is the direct consequence of a primary medical condition, or a somatoform disorder or psychological factors affecting a general medical condition. Psychiatrists specializing in Psychosomatic Medicine provide consultation-liaison services in general medical hospitals, attend on medical psychiatry inpatient units, and provide collaborative care in primary care and other outpatient settings.
Sleep Medicine - subspecialization in the diagnosis and management of sleep-related clinical conditions, including circadian rhythm disorders. This subspecialty includes the clinical assessment, polysomnographic evaluation and treatment of sleep disorders including insomnias, disorders of excessive sleepiness (e.g. narcolepsy), sleep related breathing disorders (such as obstructive sleep apnea), parasomnias, circadian rhythm disorders, sleep related movement disorders and other conditions pertaining to the sleep-wake cycle.
Vascular Neurology - subspecialization in the evaluation, prevention, treatment and recovery from vascular diseases of the nervous system. This subspecialty includes the diagnosis and treatment of vascular events of arterial or venous origin from a large number of causes that affect the brain or spinal cord such as ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, spinal cord ischemia and spinal cord hemorrhage.